Writing Prompt #182: “30 Day Disney Challenge” (Day 17)

30 Day Disney Challenge

Image Credit: Meerkat Musings

Day 17 – Your least favorite classic

Dumbo (1941)

Dumbo-1941-poster.jpg

I’ve only seen Dumbo once or twice in my entire life. I have trouble with movies about animals in peril or trouble, I always have.


Come back tomorrow for a new post!


Until the next headline, Laura Beth 🙂

Writing Prompt #181: “30 Day Disney Challenge” (Day 16)

30 Day Disney Challenge

Image Credit: Meerkat Musings

Day 16 – Your favorite classic

Fantasia (1940)

Image result for fantasia 1940

Image result for fantasia 1940

Image result for fantasia 1940

It’s so hard to pick a favorite!

I love this movie. The classical music alone, mostly performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra, is top-notch. My favorite segments are The Sorceror’s Apprentice and Night on Bald Mountain. I clearly remember both of them frightening me at first, but as I gained a greater appreciation for both classical music and animation, I fell in love.

I was in orchestra for eight years, from fifth grade through high school. We learned to play several pieces featured in the movie. To this day, I think my favorite is Night on Bald Mountain.


Come back tomorrow for a new post!


Until the next headline, Laura Beth 🙂

Book Review #50: “The Great Gatsby”

The Great Gatsby - Complex

Image Credit: Complex

I may have mentioned before that I re-read The Great Gatsby at least once every year. This Book Review attempts to express my deep love and appreciation for this novel, first published in 1925.

I was first introduced to this thrilling work of fiction in Mr. Degnan’s English class in high school. At the time, I knew bits and pieces of the eras known as “The Jazz Age” and “The Roaring Twenties,” but I hadn’t willingly picked up a work written by F. Scott Fitzgerald until this particular assignment.

Fortunately, I wasn’t disappointed.

Told from the perspective of Nick Carraway, a man in his late twenties, the book catapults you head-first into the crazy world of New York City and Long Island during the summer of 1922. Nick is surrounded by a literal cast of characters, including Jay Gatsby, the owner of an extravagant, opulent mansion. Nick rents the modest bungalow next door, and is immediately awestruck by Gatsby, the incredible parties he hosts, the rumors that swirl, and the air of mystery. What follows in the coming days and months is a violent whirlwind of many parties, little work, lots of dancing, plenty of food and drink, and a time of celebration following The Great War’s end.

Nick reconnects with his cousin, Daisy Fay Buchanan. She is married to one of Nick’s college acquaintances, Tom. Jordan Baker, a beautiful amateur golfer, soon enters Nick’s life and his heart. Along the way, Nick learns that Tom has one main mistress, Myrtle Wilson, and rents an apartment in the city for other affairs.

An invitation to one of Gatsby’s parties thrusts Nick into another world. He learns the man is borderline obsessed with Daisy. Five years have passed since their chance encounter. However, Nick can see that Gatsby desperately wants to reconnect with her. Over time, he uses Nick surreptitiously to accomplish his goal.

Throughout the novel, affairs run rampant and can easily make the reader’s head spin. The dancing, music, and illegal alcohol will do that, too.

The characters’ personalities are heightened, and sometimes incredibly violent and unsettling. The fights and shouting feel real, and the hot summer day that serves as the novel’s climax makes me sweat every time.

Several of the characters suffer quite tragic consequences, and by the very end, many are bitter and disillusioned, to say the least. There’s a sense of an incredible downward spiral.

The novel is long enough to take readers on an incredible adventure set in a span of just a few months, but short enough to be thrilling, breathtaking, and entertaining without getting stale. Reading Gatsby for the first time inspired me to dive into Fitzgerald’s world and read more of his work. Trust me, it’s worth it.

Finishing the book leaves me in a slightly depressive mood, but in the end, it’s worth it. It gives me a sense of what those years were like for those who experienced it, in the cities, in modest houses, and in the ashes.

5 out of 5 stars.


Until the next headline, Laura Beth 🙂