Awesome Authors #9: Tom Perrotta

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Image Credit: AZ Quotes

I love so many podcasts, which is a great problem to have. Last month, I finally listened to the NPR Fresh Air interview with Tom Perrotta, which originally aired on July 31st.

I remember reading part of Election when I was younger, and I have seen parts of the movie. But, listening to the Fresh Air interview makes me want to re-read it, and read more of his work.


Born in August 1961, Perrotta was raised in New Jersey. His family roots are Italian and Albanian. He is one of three children. He decided early on that he wanted to be a writer. He wrote several short stories for his high school literary magazine. After high school, Perrotta went to Yale University for his bachelor’s degree, and then earned his master’s from Syracuse University. He married in 1991, and lives in Massachusetts, near Boston.

Since 1988, he has published seven novels, multiple short stories, two collections of short stories, two essays, and at least one ghostwritten novel. Several of his works have been turned into screenplays for film and TV. The most recent adaptation was The Leftovers, for HBO.


Election (1998)

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Image Credit: Wikipedia

The story involves high school and presidential elections in 1992. I look forward to reading this again, and then watching the movie (1999).

Little Children (2004)

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Image Credit: Wikipedia

This book is Perrotta’s most-lauded and praised books. This is definitely on my list. Like Election, it was adapted into a film (2006).

Mrs. Fletcher (2017)

Mrs Fletcher

Image Credit: Amazon

I look forward to reading this. The Fresh Air interview about this book was spellbinding. I wonder if this one will become a film?


What about you?

Have you read any of Tom Perrotta’s work?


Until the next headline, Laura Beth 🙂

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Awesome Authors #8: Sharon M. Draper

I first discovered Sharon M. Draper in high school. I found The Battle of Jericho at the Russell Memorial Library in Chesapeake. She introduced me to a whole new world. Through her books, I quickly gained a better understanding of African-American teenagers and their lives. Draper’s writing is incredibly realistic, and I felt connected to many of the characters. I’m adding a few of her books to my TBR, also.


Sharon M. Draper was born August 21, 1948. Born in Cleveland, Ohio, she graduated from Pepperdine University. She’s married, and has two children, a son and a daughter.

She was named the 1997 National Teacher of the Year. She has received multiple national and international awards and recognition. Draper is a five-time winner of the Coretta Scott King Award. Several of her books have been listed on the New York Times Bestseller List.


Hazelwood Trilogy

I read this trilogy, one after the other, after reading The Battle of Jericho. It was so life-like, I needed a break after finishing the series. It shows the consequences of driving drunk, to say the least.

Jericho series

I read The Battle of Jericho first, and then I had to wait until November Blues was published in my senior year of high school. I remember feeling ecstatic when Just Another Hero was announced when I was in college. Like the Hazelwood trilogy, Draper covers many real-life topics in these books, including hazing, teenage pregnancy, tragic deaths, and school shootings, to name a few.

 

Romiette and Julio (1999)

Romiette and Julio

Image Credit: sharondraper.com

I don’t actually remember reading this, so I’m adding it to my TBR.

Double Dutch (2002)

Double Dutch - Simon and Schuster

Image Credit: Simon & Schuester

Like some of the other books, I don’t remember reading this one. This is also going on the TBR!

Copper Sun (2006)

Copper Sun

Image Credit: sharondraper.com

This is one of her historical novels. I remember reading parts of it, but I don’t think I finished it. I’m putting this one on my TBR.

Fire from the Rock (2007)

Fire from the Rock - Scholastic

Image Credit: Scholastic

This is one of my favorite books from Draper. I love historical novels, and this one is written in journal / diary-style. I definitely want to re-read it soon.

Out of My Mind (2010)

Out of My Mind - Goodreads

Image Credit: Goodreads

This is another book I’m adding to my TBR. It’s told from the perspective of a girl with cerebral palsy. I have deep appreciation for writers that respectfully approach and write about individuals with challenges.


I hope Draper will continue to write and publish! I look forward to reading and re-reading her books, especially her historical novels.


What about you?

Have you read any of Sharon M. Draper’s works?


Until the next headline, Laura Beth 🙂

Book Review #50: “The Great Gatsby”

The Great Gatsby - Complex

Image Credit: Complex

I may have mentioned before that I re-read The Great Gatsby at least once every year. This Book Review attempts to express my deep love and appreciation for this novel, first published in 1925.

I was first introduced to this thrilling work of fiction in Mr. Degnan’s English class in high school. At the time, I knew bits and pieces of the eras known as “The Jazz Age” and “The Roaring Twenties,” but I hadn’t willingly picked up a work written by F. Scott Fitzgerald until this particular assignment.

Fortunately, I wasn’t disappointed.

Told from the perspective of Nick Carraway, a man in his late twenties, the book catapults you head-first into the crazy world of New York City and Long Island during the summer of 1922. Nick is surrounded by a literal cast of characters, including Jay Gatsby, the owner of an extravagant, opulent mansion. Nick rents the modest bungalow next door, and is immediately awestruck by Gatsby, the incredible parties he hosts, the rumors that swirl, and the air of mystery. What follows in the coming days and months is a violent whirlwind of many parties, little work, lots of dancing, plenty of food and drink, and a time of celebration following The Great War’s end.

Nick reconnects with his cousin, Daisy Fay Buchanan. She is married to one of Nick’s college acquaintances, Tom. Jordan Baker, a beautiful amateur golfer, soon enters Nick’s life and his heart. Along the way, Nick learns that Tom has one main mistress, Myrtle Wilson, and rents an apartment in the city for other affairs.

An invitation to one of Gatsby’s parties thrusts Nick into another world. He learns the man is borderline obsessed with Daisy. Five years have passed since their chance encounter. However, Nick can see that Gatsby desperately wants to reconnect with her. Over time, he uses Nick surreptitiously to accomplish his goal.

Throughout the novel, affairs run rampant and can easily make the reader’s head spin. The dancing, music, and illegal alcohol will do that, too.

The characters’ personalities are heightened, and sometimes incredibly violent and unsettling. The fights and shouting feel real, and the hot summer day that serves as the novel’s climax makes me sweat every time.

Several of the characters suffer quite tragic consequences, and by the very end, many are bitter and disillusioned, to say the least. There’s a sense of an incredible downward spiral.

The novel is long enough to take readers on an incredible adventure set in a span of just a few months, but short enough to be thrilling, breathtaking, and entertaining without getting stale. Reading Gatsby for the first time inspired me to dive into Fitzgerald’s world and read more of his work. Trust me, it’s worth it.

Finishing the book leaves me in a slightly depressive mood, but in the end, it’s worth it. It gives me a sense of what those years were like for those who experienced it, in the cities, in modest houses, and in the ashes.

5 out of 5 stars.


Until the next headline, Laura Beth 🙂

Getting Personal #89: Fourth TBR Recap

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Image Credit: Pinterest

Welcome back!

In case you’re interested, here are the links to my previous TBR posts:


This is what I’ve read since my last update in July:

  1. The Lost Symbol, Dan Brown
  2. The Unknown and Impossible: How a research facility in Virginia mastered the air and conquered space, Tamara Dietrich, Mark St. John Erickson, and Mike Holtzclaw
  3. The Runaway: A Maryellen Mystery, Alison Hart
  4. The Lady’s Slipper: A Melody Mystery, Emma Carlson Berne
  5. The End of Everything, Megan Abbott
  6. Love and Loyalty: A Felicity Classic 1, Valerie Tripp
  7. A Stand for Independence: A Felicity Classic 2, Valerie Tripp
  8. Gunpowder and Tea Cakes: My Journey with Felicity, Kathleen Ernst
  9. Catch Me If You Can: The True Story of a Real Fake, Frank W. Abagnale, and Stan Redding
  10. The Girl on the Train, Paula Hawkins
  11. The Journal of Scott Pendleton Collins, A World War II Soldier, Walter Dean Myers
  12. Growing Up with Aloha: A Nanea Classic 1, Kirby Larson
  13. Hula on the Home Front: A Nanea Classic 2, Kirby Larson
  14. Prints in the Sand: My Journey with Nanea, Erin Falligant

And, here’s my updated list!

Laura Beth’s To Be Read (TBR) List, as of October 2017:

  1. The Language of Silence, Tiffany Truitt
  2. Black Rabbit Hall, Eve Chase
  3. Gone With The Wind, Margaret Mitchell
  4. The Red Tent, Anita Diamant
  5. Tropic of Cancer, Henry Miller
  6. New Boy, Julian Houston
  7. The Casual Vacancy, J.K. Rowling
  8. 11/22/63, Stephen King
  9. Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, Ransom Riggs
  10. Hollow City, Ransom Riggs
  11. Library of Souls, Ransom Riggs
  12. Tales of the Peculiar, Ransom Riggs
  13. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, J.K. Rowling
  14. Quidditch Through the Ages, J.K. Rowling
  15. Laura Lamont’s Life in Pictures, Emma Straub
  16. Modern Lovers, Emma Straub
  17. In the Unlikely Event, Judy Blume
  18. You Will Know Me, Megan Abbott
  19. Dare Me, Megan Abbott
  20. The Fever: A Novel, Megan Abbott
  21. The Book Thief, Markus Zusak
  22. Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov
  23. Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption, Laura Hillenbrand
  24. Valley of the Dolls, Jacqueline Susann
  25. The Haunting of Hill House, Shirley Jackson
  26. Brown Girl Dreaming, Jacqueline Woodson
  27. Another Brooklyn, Jacqueline Woodson
  28. The Art of Memoir, Mary Karr
  29. Loving Day, Mat Johnson
  30. American Heiress: The Wild Saga of the Kidnapping, Crimes, and Trial of Patty Hearst, Jeffrey Toobin
  31. The Run of His Life: The People v. O.J. Simpson, Jeffrey Toobin
  32. The Grid: The Fraying Wires Between Americans and Our Energy Future, Gretchen Bakke
  33. Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis, J.D. Vance
  34. A Square Meal: A Culinary History of the Great Depression, Jane Ziegelman and Andy Coe
  35. Bright Lights, Big City, Jay McInerney
  36. Bright, Precious Days, Jay McInerney
  37. Underground Airlines, Ben Winters
  38. A Good Month for Murder: The Inside Story of a Homicide Squad, Del Quentin Wilber
  39. Teardrops of the Innocent: The White Diamond Story (True Colors – Volume 1), Allie Marie
  40. Grace and Grit: My Fight for Equal Pay and Fairness at Goodyear and Beyond, Lily Ledbetter
  41. The Night Circus, Erin Morgenstern
  42. Caraval, Stephanie Garber
  43. Jefferson’s Sons: A Founding Father’s Secret Children, Kimberly Brubaker Bradley
  44. The War I Finally Won, Kimberly Brubaker Bradley
  45. Read All About It: A Kit Classic Volume 1, Valerie Tripp
  46. Turning Things Around: A Kit Classic Volume 2, Valerie Tripp
  47. Full Speed Ahead: My Journey with Kit, Valerie Tripp
  48. Autumn Street, Lois Lowry
  49. The Giver, Lois Lowry
  50. Gathering Blue, Lois Lowry
  51. Messenger, Lois Lowry
  52. Son, Lois Lowry
  53. Sense and Sensibility, Jane Austen
  54. Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen
  55. Mansfield Park, Jane Austen
  56. Emma, Jane Austen
  57. Northanger Abbey, Jane Austen
  58. Persuasion, Jane Austen
  59. The List, Patricia Forde
  60. Hello Me, It’s You, Anonymous; edited by Hannah Todd
  61. Use The Force: A Jedi’s Guide to the Law of Attraction, Joshua P. Warren
  62. Digital Fortress: A Thriller, Dan Brown
  63. Deception Point, Dan Brown
  64. Inferno, Dan Brown
  65. Origin: A Novel, Dan Brown
  66. The Hate U Give, Angie Thomas
  67. Camino Island, John Grisham
  68. The Rooster Bar, John Grisham
  69. Bored and Brilliant: How Spacing Out Can Unlock Your Most Productive and Creative Self, Manoush Zomorodi
  70. Lost Laysen, Margaret Mitchell
  71. Before Scarlett: Girlhood Writings of Margaret Mitchell, Margaret Mitchell; edited by Jane Eskridge
  72. Mystic River, Dennis Lehane
  73. Shutter Island, Dennis Lehane
  74. Uglies, Scott Westerfeld
  75. Pretties, Scott Westerfeld
  76. Specials, Scott Westerfeld
  77. Extras, Scott Westerfeld
  78. Lost Girls: An Unsolved American Mystery, Robert Kolker
  79. Reading Like a Writer: A Guide for People Who Love Books and For Those Who Want to Write Them (P.S.), Francine Prose
  80. Reading Like a Lawyer: Time-Saving Strategies for Reading Law Like an Expert, Ruth Ann McKinney
  81. Into the Water, Paula Hawkins
  82. The Things They Carried, Tim O’Brien
  83. In the Lake of the Woods, Tim O’Brien
  84. July, July, Tim O’Brien
  85. To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before, Jenny Han
  86. P.S. I Still Love You, Jenny Han
  87. Always and Forever, Lara Jean, Jenny Han
  88. Sharp Objects, Gillian Flynn
  89. Dark Places, Gillian Flynn
  90. Gone Girl, Gillian Flynn
  91. Ready Player One, Ernest Cline
  92. The Glass Castle, Jeanette Walls
  93. Half Broke Horses, Jeanette Walls
  94. The Silver Star, Jeanette Walls
  95. Because You Exist (Light in the Dark Series) (Volume 1), Tiffany Truitt
  96. Among The Hidden (Shadow Children #1), Margaret Peterson Haddix
  97. The Goldfish Boy, Lisa Thompson
  98. Postcards from the Edge, Carrie Fisher
  99. Shockaholic, Carrie Fisher
  100. Wishful Drinking, Carrie Fisher
  101. The Princess Diarist, Carrie Fisher
  102. Trell, Dick Lehr
  103. In A Dark, Dark Wood, Ruth Ware
  104. The Woman in Cabin 10, Ruth Ware
  105. We Can Be Mended, Veronica Roth
  106. Carve The Mark, Veronica Roth
  107. Sing, Vivi Greene
  108. West End Quartet, Ariadne Apostolou
  109. Defining Sexism in the U.S. (Sexism in the United States) (Volume 1), Elizabeth Hall Magill
  110. Sexism and U.S. History (Sexism in the United States) (Volume 2), Elizabeth Hall Magill
  111. What Yo Mama Said, Elizabeth Hall Magill
  112. Behind Rebel Lines: The Incredible Story of Emma Edmonds, Civil War Spy, Seymour Reit
  113. Brief Interviews with Hideous Men, David Foster Wallace
  114. Simon vs. The Homo Sapiens Agenda, Becky Albertalli
  115. The Upside of Unrequited, Becky Albertalli
  116. Words in Deep Blue, Cath Crowley
  117. Turtles All the Way Down, John Green
  118. Lea Dives In, Lisa Yee
  119. Lea Leads the Way, Lisa Yee
  120. Lea and Camila, Lisa Yee & Kellen Hertz
  121. Mary Jane’s Ghost: The Legacy of a Murder in Small Town America, Ted Gregory
  122. The Dark Lake, Sarah Bailey

That’s all, for now!

I’ll publish my next TBR update / recap in January!

What have you read recently?

Happy reading!


Until the next headline, Laura Beth 🙂

Book Review #49: “Prints in the Sand: My Journey with Nanea”

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Image Credit: American Girl

If you haven’t already, I would recommend reading the other two Book Reviews I’ve written about Nanea’s books:


The BeForever Journey Books are starting to grow on me. Choosing your own adventure is so much fun!

Our modern girl is in Hawaii, on the beach with her twin brothers and their babysitter, whom she calls Auntie Oli. Her father is “overseas” in Iraq. She’s struggling with him being gone, along with other things.

A traditional puka shell necklace, much like the one Nanea is given, transports her to the Royal Hawaiian Hotel in 1942!

Along the way, our modern girl meets Nanea, Lily, the Honolulu Helpers, and climbs the Punchbowl volcano crater! She even gets to solve a mystery or two, like Nancy Drew and Sherlock Holmes!

I was impressed how the book focused on the war effort, and how women became more involved with the military.

The one major criticism was one of the paths / routes was so heavily embedded in the book, that I had a lot of trouble finding it. I wanted to read it, but it took me a long time to find it, and I got frustrated. I’m sure it was a simple oversight, but I didn’t like picking through the pages, trying to find the one route I hadn’t read yet.

I loved learning even more about Hawaii and the early war effort in this book.

4 out of 5 stars.


Until the next headline, Laura Beth 🙂

Book Review #48: “Hula for the Home Front: A Nanea Classic 2”

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Image Credit: American Girl

If you haven’t already, I would recommend reading the review of the first Nanea volume before checking out this one:


At the end of Classic 1, Nanea and her friends were preparing to return to school, nearly two months after the horrific attack on Pearl Harbor.

To Nanea’s dismay, there’s a new girl in her class. Her name is Dixie Moreno, and Nanea immediately struggles to be nice to her. Donna has left for the mainland, and Nanea is still sour about that. However, Nanea tries hard to not “borrow trouble” and show kindness to Dixie. Along the way, they help each other out, and start to become friends.

Meanwhile, hula is a central theme in this volume. Nanea finds joy in her lessons, and she learns that her dog, Mele, is a talented dancer!

As Nanea prepares to celebrate her tenth birthday, things begin to relax a bit on the island. Her family and friends come together to pull off an excellent birthday surprise! She’s excited to celebrate, but she remains observant and guarded. Her brother, David, constantly talks about Lieutenant Gregory and how much he wants to enlist. He turns 18 in a few months’ time. Nanea is scared, and angry. How will she express her feelings?

Nanea learns several important lessons – Patience, understanding, a hint of wisdom, and how to make her own contributions to the war effort. Through hula, War Stamps, and a few other things, she learns that even kids can make a difference!

Like the first volume, I received an excellent education about Hawaii and its involvement in the early stages of the U.S. entering World War II. I was impressed at how much detail was included. I can only imagine how much research was done! The books also discussed the challenges that many Japanese-Americans faced in the aftermath of Pearl Harbor, and it was well-written.

I’m looking forward to reading her Journey Book! Look for that review soon!

5 out of 5 stars.


Until the next headline, Laura Beth 🙂

Book Review #47: “Growing Up with Aloha: A Nanea Classic 1”

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Image Credit: American Girl

As soon as American Girl announced Nanea as their newest BeForever Historical Character, I knew I wanted to read her books!

These books are relatively quick reads for me, but since I love historical fiction, I try really hard to pay attention to all the details!

Nanea’s story begins in 1941, on the island of Oahu, in Hawaii. Her given name is Alice Nanea, and the author packs a variety of Hawaiian words into the story. She’s the baby of the family, with an older brother, David, and an older sister, Mary Lou. Her mother is a Hawaiian native, while her father is from Oregon, from the mainland. I had to remind myself that Hawaii wasn’t a state yet!

Nanea enjoys spending time with her friends, Lily and Donna. They like shave ice on the beach, learning and performing hula, and school.

As the story progresses, we learn that Nanea’s father is a welder for one of the shipyards. Pearl Harbor is bustling with activity, especially as World War II has ramped up over the last several years. However, many on the island go about their daily business, welcoming tourists and taking care of their families.

A special contest is being held, and Nanea and her friends are excited to enter. The prize is a brand-new Schwinn bike! They have to meet four criteria. The deadline to enter is December 15th.

Then, on December 7th, everything changes. Pearl Harbor is attacked by the Japanese. Nanea’s father has to work around the clock, and her brother and sister volunteer their time and effort in the community. Nanea feels like the baby again, wanting to help, but being too young. Everyone is scared as martial law is declared, blackouts begin, and schools are closed.

Christmas doesn’t feel very festive, but the family celebrates anyway. They rekindle the Hawaiian spirit of “ohana” and “aloha.”

This story wraps up around January 1942. Just as things begin to look normal again, Nanea and her friends learn that one of them may have to leave because of the Army’s orders. Nanea wants to help her friends, but she’s not sure how!

Overall, I dug deep into Nanea’s story. I found myself dreaming about the story and picturing certain scenes every night when I went to bed. I really want to visit Hawaii now!

I really appreciate the attention to historical accuracy, while making it relevant to the main audience. Nanea may be the baby, but she’s starting to grow up. And, I learned a few new things along the way!

I’m already thirteen chapters into Volume 2 – Look for that review soon!

5 out of 5 stars.


Until the next headline, Laura Beth 🙂